We are currently seeking Ph.D. students who are highly motivated to develop the next generation of catalysts for energy and sustainability applications!

Postdoctoral researchers with external sources of funding are also encouraged to apply.

If interested please send your CV and cover letter to Dr. Melis Duyar at m.duyar@surrey.ac.uk

 

Available Projects

integrated Carbon dioxide capture and utilisation

This is a fully funded Ph.D. project focusing on developing dual function materials (DFMs) that can capture carbon dioxide from an emission source and release it as a high value fuel or chemical upon exposure to a reducing co-reactant. By coupling carbon dioxide capture to an exothermic reduction reaction, the energy demand of carbon dioxide release from adsorption sites is balanced by the energy produced from the exothermic reaction.

Dual function materials can be used to capture carbon dioxide from power plants and directly convert it to reduced products. When hydrogen from water electrolysis is used as co-reactant, the integrated carbon dioxide capture and utilisation scheme can also enable the storage of renewable energy in the form of chemical bonds.

Dual function materials can be used to capture carbon dioxide from power plants and directly convert it to reduced products. When hydrogen from water electrolysis is used as co-reactant, the integrated carbon dioxide capture and utilisation scheme can also enable the storage of renewable energy in the form of chemical bonds.

Dependence on fossil fuels for energy and chemicals have resulted in the increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere, responsible for climate change and ocean acidification. Post-combustion carbon dioxide capture can be energy intensive and costly, which limits its deployment at the massive scales needed to combat climate change. What can make this situation more attractive from an energetic and economic perspective is to combine carbon dioxide capture and catalysis in a single reactor; in this scenario a dual function material with adsorbent and catalytic capability takes advantage of an exothermic chemical transformation of carbon dioxide to drive the endothermic desorption process from adsorbent sites, avoiding temperature or pressure swing steps that are conventionally employed. 

This project will be conducted in the Chemical and Process Engineering Department at University of Surrey beginning in October 2019. The focus of this project is to develop new dual function materials by investigating the catalytic transformations of carbon dioxide, catalyst performance under cyclic conditions and upon integration with adsorbent materials. The ideal candidate will hold a Master’s degree in Chemical Engineering or a relevant discipline. Prior experimental research experience is desirable.